Tag Archives: Personal

New publication!

Oof this blog has been neglected. I’m not entirely sure what I want to do with this blog – keep it about genre fiction and its nuances? Start adding some personal stuff? I’ll think about it.

Until then, some good news! I have a poem now up at Fireside Magazine. Come take a look, I’ve bared my soul.

Publication news!

Forgot to announce it!! My short story, THE SEAFARER, will be appearing in Queen of Swords Press anthology, Scourge of the Seas of Time (and Space)!

This is my first publication, and I’m very proud of my work (and super excited to be a part of an anthology!)

I’ve been riding the residual pirate feels from Black Sails to produce both this and another short story in this universe. Finishing up a third and onto the novella! Hopefully I can get it done before the end of August. They’re no Caribbean pirates, and some of the themes are slightly different, but Black Sails was a Key Source for those good, good gay pirate feelings.

Anyway, the table of contents looks super interesting and if anyone’s interested in some good lgbt pirate content, I highly suggest checking it out when it’s released this December! My Barbary pirates will be included c:

The Nitpicks: A Note on Genre Fiction and Elitism within Literary Academia

I’ve written this rant elsewhere, on my tumblr, but this will be a more “polished” version, so to speak. I’ve put it under nitpicks, although it’s bigger than that. It’s more of a criticism of literary academia, which is very big. Something I’m almost hesitant to criticize. But I think as genre fiction and speculative fiction grow, the circle jerk within literary academia and its obsession over contemporary and misery fades a little. Just a little.

I’ll preface this with, I know the community is changing, and I know attitudes are changing with it. But there’s still a heavy bias toward “literary” fiction in the world of academia – where “real world issues” and “real people” are held higher than when issues are raised in a more fantastical setting with more fantastical characters. Anything beyond the “real world” gets thrown under a bus and considered to be, at best, entertainment, and at worst, something to rot your brain over. It might not be changing as much as I would like, but it’s changing. Slowly.

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